Tag Archives: diana henry

diana henry’s japanese garlic and ginger chicken with smashed cucumber

31 Mar

Scan 5

More cookbooks! Disaster. The latest addition to my collection has not yet been added to the shelf. It lives on my sofa and I open it at random for inspiration. Let’s see:

“Beluga lentil, roast grape and red chicory salad.” Intriguing, roast grapes. An Autumn recipe in hues of violet and red. Let’s aim for Spring:

“Butterflied leg of lamb with sekenjabin.” With what? Oooh, a “Persian mint syrup.” Best with flatbread or couscous and broadbeans. Mmm. Turn the page:

“Chocolate and rosemary sorbet” on the same leaf as “Grapefruit and mint sorbet.” All of my favourite flavours!

A Change of Appetite: where healthy meets delicious is an adventure in flavour, an exploration of healthy food without austerity or preaching. It is a fresh and beautiful cookbook. There are whole seasons full of recipes, with intermittent pages of musings on grains, proper lunches, the Japanese philosophy in food. I’m afraid to say the piece on calories rang unfortunately true: eat 500 calories chocolate, skip dinner. Works out even right? Not really.

As a pastry chef, I find it hard to condone dieting. (I’d be out of a job.) And I don’t believe abstention or detoxes work long-term. But too much sugar does have an effect on my body and my mood.

Henry doesn’t ask you to diet either. Just to take a little more care, add a few more green leaves and prepare meals with tons of flavour, inspired by Japan or Iran or Bulgaria. The healthy aspect works because the recipes really pique my appetite. And Ottolenghi’s apparently; his stamp of approval is on the front cover.

The ginger and garlic chicken I served at a dinner the other day was sharp and savoury and mouthwatering. Even with the chicken all eaten, the sauce was so good my guests took more wild rice just to soak it up. The cucumber with ginger has real character too, the rare occasion when cucumber has a starring role. It was all light and fresh and just enough. Satisfying.

I have to admit that we did have a first course of eggs and spinach, and later a cheese course with three cheeses and fresh salted butter then dessert. But, France. We had modest portions of each and still didn’t feel like we had to roll home afterwards.

The garlic-ginger chicken is going into regular rotation. (Using the grated and frozen ginger leftover from my homemade ginger juice.) In fact I am going to marinate individual portions in zip-lock bags and freeze them. Then in the morning I can defrost one bag or several in the fridge, ready to bake at suppertime. Virtuous ready-meals!

Next on the list: “Spelt and oat porridge with pomegranates and pistachios.” Wish it was breakfast time already.

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Diana Henry’s Japanese Garlic and Ginger Chicken with smashed cucumber

from A Change of Appetite

serves 4

8 chicken thighs (bone-in) or 4 whole chicken legs

3 1/2 tbs soy sauce

3 tbs sake or dry sherry (or in a pinch, white wine)

3 tbs dark brown sugar

1/2 tbs brown/red miso

60g fresh ginger, peeled and grated

4 garlic cloves, crushed or grated

1 tsp togarashi seasoning (or 1/2 tsp chili powder)

Smashed cucumber:

500g cucumber

2 garlic cloves, chopped

2 tsp sea salt

2 tbs pink pickled ginger, finely chopped

handful of shiso leaves, torn up (or mint)

Mix together marinade ingredients. If baking that day, preheat oven to 200C, arrange chicken in a baking dish in a single layer and pour over marinade. Let sit for at least 20 minutes while oven preheats (or a few hours in the fridge). If not, put chicken pieces in a zip-lock bag (or several), divide the marinade between them and freeze.

Bake chicken for 30-40 minutes depending on size of pieces, basting with marinade halfway. To check if the chicken legs are fully cooked, stab with a sharp knife and see if the juices run clear. If they are a little pink, carry on cooking.

Meanwhile, peel and de-seed the cucumber. Chop roughly. Put cucumber, garlic and salt in a zip-lock bag and bash it a few times with a rolling pin. This step can be done on a chopping board but is much more messy. Refrigerate until chicken is ready. Drain of any liquid and serve the cucumber topped with finely sliced pickled ginger and shiso (or mint).

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je brunch, tu brunch: sweet

23 Sep

brunch sweet 2

(Following on from je brunch, tu brunch: savoury)

For sweet teeth, two cakes to start with: a round chocolate and a square upside-down pear and pecan (from Diana Henry). Both rich and full of flavour, stand-alone cakes – no need for icing or frills.

When cooking for a crowd in a miniature oven, it is best to choose at least one simple recipe that you know off by heart, that you can mix together in five minutes and have in the oven straightaway while you read and measure the next, new recipe. Then you have time to slice pears and caramelise them, and to whip up a fluffy buttermilk sponge.

My chocolate fondant recipe is a piece of cake (ha) and so decadent it tastes like a lot of effort went into it: Melt 200g chocolate and 200g butter over a bain marie. Whisk 170g sugar and 5 eggs in a large bowl. Stir in chocolate mix and 125g ground nuts (hazelnuts are nice). Pour into a 22cm greased and papered tin, bake for 25 minutes at 175C until just starting to crack, not wobbly but still soft. Optional extras: orange zest, cinnamon, 2 tsp instant coffee dissolved in 1 tbsp boiling water. Slice very finely and decorate with icing sugar.

Another easy option: the Nigella clementine cake. Instead of boiling the fruit for two hours as traditional, you microwave them, covered, for eight minutes, turning once. Then blend, add sugar, eggs and ground almonds. Done. Simple but with a depth of flavour; moist and fragrant, both dairy and gluten free.

brunch sweet 1

Meringues keep well and can be prepared a few days in advance. Pipe bite-sized versions in neat swirls for a professional finish. Ottolenghi’s brown sugar and cinnamon meringues have you dissolve all the sugar in the egg whites over a bain-marie, which creates glossy meringues that are delightfully sticky on the inside.

So, on the sweet side of the brunch table, there are already two cakes and some meringues. Maybe some cookies dug up from the freezer. I like making logs of shortbread mixture and freezing half for a later date, to slice and bake as many as needed.

And finally, a fruit compote for the glut of produce in the markets at the moment: for autumn, figs and plums cooked in syrupy red wine, sprinkled with fresh purple grapes (Henry again). I didn’t follow the recipe properly but the result was still lovely: I cooked a dozen large figs, halved, with a dozen fat plums, in red wine with sugar and a bit of liquorice vodka until soft. Then removed the fruit, simmered the sauce to a thick syrup and decorated with red grapes. All in a luxurious velvety purple, sweet and ripe. Delicious with fromage blanc.

brunch sweet 3

Enough to feed an army yet? With a few added extras – homemade lemon curd, some iced coffee –  your brunch should leave your guests in a happy (comatose) heap on the sofa…

je brunch, tu brunch: savoury

19 Sep

potato, rosemary and bacon quiche

I like to play hostess. Whatever your kingdom of nerdery may be – knitting, formula one, tumblrs of George Harrison looking awkward – I will let you have it. I will be daydreaming on the metro about menus. Maybe a week beforehand, I will be going through a stack of recipe books and post-it pages. I will make lists and lists of lists, of ingredients and guests. I will carefully calculate oven real-estate, because it is so small I can only make or heat one cake or tart at a time.

(In reality, the lists are only useful half the time, because often I get distracted with an aperitif and a friend and forget to prepare the the meringues three days in advance. I miss the market and have to get up early on the day, buying grapes because blackberries are nowhere to be found.)

The people that eventually arrive are secondary, sometimes, to the quiet pleasure of an evening juggling in my tiny kitchen, piling plates onto the washing machine and restacking the fridge to fit tart shells, bowls of whipped cream, cold-brewed coffee. Sometimes I weep into the washing-up when there is just no space left.

Brunch has the most scope for me – an amorphous meal that can encompass all of my latest favourites, savoury and sweet, mostly prepared in advance. Friends can drop by whenever with baguettes and flowers and help themselves to the spread.

For my three year Franceversary (three years! how?) I wanted brunch. For all of the above reasons, and for the fact that the last two years meant waking at 5.30 a.m. on Saturdays and Sundays. So no time for lazy brunches. In the cookbook pile this time was Ottolenghi’s The Cookbook, my old favourite of Diana Henry’s Roast Figs, and Bill Sewell’s Food from the Place Below. And my mother’s book, for reference.

ottolenghi's fennel feta and pomegranate salad

Here is my planning then, for a brunch to feed 10-15, with minimal effort on the day:

You need something savoury but breakfasty, probably with eggs. I have hated French toast ever since Scout camp when we called it “eggy bread” made of the polystyrene white sliced. I do love eggs benedict, or a stack of corn fritters but if you are serving more than four you cannot make to order.

Quiche is easiest for preparing ahead, and infinitely variable. Bill’s blog has the perfect quiche ratios and rules – the right combination of roast vegetables, always lots of cream, no milk. When I worked at the Café at All Saints I would invariably choose his quiche for lunch, crisp and golden on top, with scalloped edges of wholemeal pastry. The vegetables would invariably be roasted first to release a lot of water and concentrate their flavour – perfect for a sturdy quiche.

Mine was potato, rosemary and bacon quiche made with an extra ripe camembert. The night before I sauteed roughly chopped onion with lardons, then added some parboiled sliced potatoes (because my oven was too busy to roast them!) and at the end, rosemary and mustard. The wholemeal pastry was prepared overnight and left in the fridge to chill. The next morning I rolled it out, baked it blind and then filled with the potatoes and smelly cheese. I mixed eggs, cream and a good dollop of mustard (see Bill’s blog for the quantities). I made the mistake of filling the quiche to the brim and spilled some cream moving it to the oven: it is much easier to top it up in the oven.

That makes 10-12 slices as part of a larger meal (or 8 with plain green leaves for lunch). Then an enormous and colourful salad – four thinly sliced fennel bulbs tossed with 200g feta and some sumac, topped with the seeds of a pomegranate (Ottolenghi). I had an early arrival make the salad for me – trick your guests into being useful!

One more easy savoury item: a herby cornbread from my mother’s repertoire. The dry ingredients were weighed the night before so in the morning I just stirred in yoghurt, eggs and oil. It was ready in 45 minutes, served warm and fluffy with a delicate bite from the cornmeal.

brunch savoury 3

Next, of course, sweet things: cakes biscuits and a killer chocolate spread…

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